Temporary Software Is Not

I (Don’t) Have a Plan

I have a home gym in the middle of my dining room.

Why would I put it there, you ask?

Excellent question.

It had been in the basement in pieces since the last time I moved.  I wanted to start using it again, but wasn’t sure I still had all the parts.

Luckily, the assembly instructions were online, so I started lining the pieces up.

I worked on it near my computer so I could follow along with the instructions on the screen.  I ended up assembling the entire thing while trying to figure it out, which took a few hours.

There was one washer missing, so no big deal.

Now the heavy gym, fully assembled in my dining room, with 200lbs of weights and rubber feet on the bottom, wouldn’t slide across the linoleum floor.

I usually come up with clever solutions, like putting paper under the feet to reduce the friction.  But the end with 200lbs of weight doesn’t have any way to lift it up to slide the paper under.

I had taken a shortcut just to see if it could be built.  I used the “temporary” solution instead of printing out the instructions and hauling all the heavy pieces up another floor to the spare bedroom.

Well now the dining room is my workout room.

The same thing happens to software.

It’s Just Temporary, No Need to Waste Time On Planning

If you don’t take the time to build it correctly right from the start, you end up with something that gets in the way more often than it helps.

I only use my home gym a few times a week (well, let’s pretend I do), so it’s not really a big deal that it’s in the wrong place.  Your software is something you use every day, so all the extra time it takes to make it work adds up over the year.

You may think since it’s a temporary solution, shortcuts are fine.

Very rarely is any piece of software actually “temporary”.  Most of the temporary solutions I’ve seen have been in place for years, and the users struggle to make them work properly.

And the business pays for all that lost time and energy.

I don’t want to spend hours taking my home gym apart, and hours more reassembling it.  Nor do you want to do that with your software, which takes considerably more than a few hours.

If you don’t have the time and money to do it right the first time, will you have the time and money to redo it later?

Plan your software and make sure it’s the best business asset you can possibly build.  That’s what I do – contact me when you’re ready to build it right.

 

About the Author Phillip Theriault

I am a computer programmer specializing in building database software with ASP.NET MVC, C#, and SQL Server.

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